Club news

Central no match for Liverpool


September 19, 1892
Liverpool kicked off, and had to face a brilliant sun. Wyllie was the first to make head way, but Robinson and Smith displayed excellent defence. Southport left then troubled Hannah. McQue was next prominent, and J. Gee had to clear.

The game became very fast, and there was not much to choose between the teams until close upon half time, when Liverpool took a strong lead and kept the Southport custodian fully employed, shots from McBride, McVean, and Wyllie being successfully negotiated by Gee, who averted danger till change of ends and came in for quite an ovation on crossing over.

On resuming, Liverpool at once took up the running, and, after McQue had shot over, the Southport left broke away, and Ross had to handle. Play was stopped, owing to McLean coming down heavily and dislocating his arm, but he pluckily returned and continued playing, the injured limb being strapped across his breast. This stoppage was followed almost immediately by another one, Platt being the victim this time.

Kelvin got up too late to take advantage of a grand chance, and at length Liverpool gained the much-longed-for goal through the instrumentality of Smith. Southport rushed the game to the other end, and an excellent opportunity was thrown away, both Platt and Winstanley finishing badly.

Wyllie had hard lines at the top goal, the ball rebounding from the upright, and a flying visit was paid to the other end, where captain Hannah cleared in the goal mouth, and the Liverpool right gained possession. Wyllie shot in, and from an exciting scrimmage Liverpool scored a second goal just as the whistle blew.

Teams:
Liverpool: Sydney Ross, Andrew Hannah, Duncan McLean, John Cameron, Joe McQue, James McBride, Thomas Wyllie, Jock Smith, John Miller, Malcolm McVean, Andrew Kelvin.
Southport Central: Jimmy Gee, Tom Smith, Bethel Robinson, Charles Gee, Charles McLaren, John Mayor, Jack Platt, Fleetwood, Albert Winstanley, Lollie Halsall, Miller.
(Source: Liverpool Mercury: September 19, 1892)

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