Heywood Gossip


January 14, 1893
It seemed as if Heywood Central were playing Scotland on Saturday, for the Liverpool team was almost entirely composed of Macs of that ilk. And they were Macs and no mistakes, fine strapping young fellows, thoroughly worthy of and representative in every respect of the land o’cakes. No less than seven of the players’ names started with “Mac.”

There were McQueen, McQue, McWhinnie, &c., &c. However, the Bamford Road men, although not nearly so heavy, were quite as good as the Scottish Liverpudlians. I heard one person remark as the match was over that the best team had won, and I heard it retorted that the team which had scored the most goals had lost. That, Mr. Editor, sounds very funny, but it is accounted for in this wise.

In the first portion Sydney Ross, the Liverpool custodian, fumbled on a couple of occasions, and it is alleged the ball got a yard over the line before he managed to throw it out again, but although strong claims were made for goals, the referee to no notice of them.

Smarting under the severe defeat of 6-2, at Liverpool the previous Saturday, the Centralians were bent on winning, and f straining every nerve would do it they meant business. They started off at high pressure speed, but Andrew Hanna and Duncan McLean repulsed them times out of number. They were, however, not to be denied, and at the interval they had a goal to their credit.

On turning round the visitors had a look in and Thomas Wyllie equalised with a good shot. They maintained the pressure and after 20 minutes’ play forged ahead. Afterwards they kept their opponents well in hand and they ran out victors of a stiff encounter, on a snowbound ground, by two goals to one.

Liverpool have thus taken four points out of Heywood Central in the Lancashire League tourney. Evans played again at back and his fine display was a marked contrast with that at Anfield.
(Source: Cricket and Football Field: January 14, 1893)

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