Liverpool v Lincoln City


February 11, 1893
Liverpool played their first home league engagement on Saturday, at Anfield, and despite the threatening weather fully 5,000 enthusiastic spectators assembled to witness the game.

Liverpool: William McOwen, Andrew Hannah, Duncan McLean, John McCartney, Joe McQue, James McBride, Patrick Gordon, Malcolm McVean, Matt McQueen, James Stott, Hugh McQueen.
Lincoln City: Fred Jones, Quentin Neill, Herbert Simpson, George McMillan, Michael Richardson, Herbert Wiltshire, John Chadburn, John Irving, Don Lees, Albert Flewitt, Joe Raby.

Liverpool
opened in promising fashion, and had the best of the early exchanges, when McQue kicked over the line. M. McQueen then followed with a smart run down the centre, when Jones managed to effect clearance. Chadburn, on behalf of Lincoln, raised the siege and pretty combination brought the leather into the vicinity of McOwen, who, however, was on the alert, and saved easily.

McQue initiated an attack, and parting to Gordon, that player gave a nice chance to McVean, who almost defeated the visiting custodian. Chadburn again essayed to break through the impregnable defence of Liverpool, but generally found McBride and McLean too much for him, although on one occasion he succeeded in eluding the latter, and sprinting in grand fashion, tested McOwen with a stinger.

A foul well taken by McCartney was cleverly headed out by Neill, but McBride met the return, and by a finely judged attempt sent the ball into the net with a fast low shot. Upon restarting Lincoln endeavoured to break through, but exceptionally play by McQue repelled all their efforts, and the home team were again the aggressors. But a short time had elapsed when McBride added to his previous success by scoring a second point, amidst tremendous cheers.

The home forwards now played up with a great dash, and Gordon and McQueen secured fruitless corners. Brilliant passing on the left wing threatened fresh danger, but H. McQueen’s final stroke was gamely repulsed by Tice.

After the “Citizens” had had a momentary look in, principally through the efforts of Chadburn, Leeds and Flewitt, Stott obtained possession, and with his characteristic headlong dash brushed aside all opposition, and passing at the right time Gordon easily converted the attempt into another goal for Liverpool.

In the second half the visitors livened up a little, and after a gallant piece of play by McBride, Lincoln retaliated, and obtained a foul close in the mouth of goal, which, upon being taken, passed into the net without being touched. Still maintaining the advantage, the visitors formed an exciting scrimmage in front of the Liverpool goal, which was only saved with the greatest difficulty.

Liverpool again took up an offensive position, and Gordon and McVean doing good service on the right carried the ball into the enemy’s territory, and McVean wound up by securing the fourth goal. The point seemed to completely demoralise the visitors, all their efforts being met with the greatest ease, and eventually the game ended in a decisive win for Liverpool by 4 goals to nil.
(Source: Liverpool Mercury: September 11, 1893)

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