Barnsley F.C.: The annual meeting of 1897


May 31, 1897
The adjourned annual meeting of this club was held at the Clarence Hotel last night, Councillor Charlesworth presiding.

The Chairman, remarking that the balance sheet would probably not please everyone, bespoke patience and loyalty to the club. There should be no difficulty in carrying on the club.

The statement of accounts for the year was as follows: –
The principal items on the receipt side were: Gate money, £753 13s.; subscription, £164 18s; loan of ground, £9 15s.; Christmas draw, £43 4s. 5d.; loan, £16; miscellaneous, £11 11s. 10d.; making up a total income of £1,006 17s. 9d.

The expenditure included: Wages to players, £512 7s. 5d.; railway fares for players, £39 4s. 6d.; referees, £21 16s. 11d.; players’ tackling, £41 2s. 6d.; printing and advertising, £47 1s. 11d., railway fares and refreshments of players, £133 10s.; the whole leaving a balance due to the treasurer of £131 10s.

The balance sheet showed on valuation of assets and liabilities £63 6s. 11d. The balance sheet against the club was about £10 more than last year.

On the motion of Mr. Jaeger it was agreed to recommend the committee to sue any member, who, having used his ticket, should refuse to pay.

Mr. J. Raley, in moving the balance sheet be passed, said he did not consider it unsatisfactory, when they remembered that before Christmas they hadn’t two fine Saturdays at home. £130 was not a hopeless debt. They hadn’t got the Easter Monday yet. Their friend or otherwise of the Barnsley Cricket Club stuck to the Easter Monday, to which they had as much right as the football club had to Feast Monday. If they would not allow the Easter Monday to the football club they must not be surprised if they didn’t get anything on Feast Monday.

The balance sheet was adopted, and the Chairman said he hoped to see the debt wiped off by next season, and added that something was being done to meet the “moral debt,” which was not named in the balance sheet.
(Source: Sheffield Independent: June 1, 1897)

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