The local derby talked about in the trenches


November 30, 1915
The local “Derby” is now being talked over in the trenches. The Tommies will have some fierce arguments over the unexpected turn in events, and for the first time for sixteen years the Liverpool F.C. followers will be able to crow. It was a blow to all “formulas.” Everton never looked more likely to succeed than on form and on their play of the first half-hour. As I said on Friday, “these ante prospects from Liverpool’s point of view were all the more likely to bring Liverpool to victory.”

And so it was. Unfortunately, two members were damaged by the game, Tommy Fern’s back giving him much pain and Fred Pagnam receiving a very sharp cut on the nose – pure accident, this, Billy Wareing not being to blame in any way. Pagnam gets into the wars pretty often, but he’s made of stern stuff, and gives and takes knocks with equanimity. Most players after nursing a fractured rib, for a week, would have forsaken the “Derby” game, but not Pagnam. He went through it and increased his goal average.

Elisha Scott’s goalkeeping was one of the prominent features of the game, and everywhere the young and agile Irishman has been complimented upon his display of punching. It was clean and sure, and was quite and old fashioned exhibition of goalkeeping.

Then Arthur Goddard’s pertinacity and somewhat roving style brought him into the leading lights of the game. They call Goddard “the old war horse.” But a man’s as old as he feels, and Goddard can spend many a season yet as pivot of the team, and can subsequently turn his attention to the “sleeping partner’s” job which is the name I give to the outside left position, a berth that does not call for anything but occasional sprints and centres and sometimes a shot.

A number of people have been asking where Kenneth Campbell has got to, as he does not assist Liverpool these days. The fact is he and his regiment have been pushed up to Barrow-in-Furness.

Kenny sent the players a wire wishing them luck, as did also Jimmy Nicholl, who is mining in Scotland. The three successive victories Liverpool have obtained – Southport, Oldham, and Everton, form the trio – make good Liverpool’s prospects for Saturday next, when Bolton Wanderers are their visitors. They are certain to be keen on victory against the Wanderers, as at the moment Liverpool and Everton are level, barring goals in the League chart.
(Liverpool Echo: November 30, 1915)

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