Preston North End the better side


January 3, 1916
Fred Pagnam was damaged in the first minute, and I am confident his failure to score was due to the bang he received on the stomach in the first five minutes of play. I have before now declared that the day will come when Pagnam will possibly break all goal-scoring records by gathering in a harvest of goals. Such a day as Saturday – with the wind carrying the ball inordinate lengths – was eminently the sort of day that suited my argument.

But, unfortunately, Ephraim Longworth, after seeming to win the toss, had to to set his team to face the rain and wind. This was Pagnam’s chance destroyed. Had Liverpool won the toss I feel sure Pagnam would have revelled in a goal-crop. As it was he was damaged, and, like the other members of the team, was fatigued by the strenuous game necessary against the wind. He did not do himself justice in the second half, and, in addition, he had little support from the left wing, which did not pair well, although in the first half they showed pretty footwork at times, and James Dawson made a glorious teasing shot from the touchline. Wilfred Watson had a fit of dribbles, and the little debutante on the extreme right suffered correspondingly.

What think you of Robert Waine?

Tough, bullet-head Waine by his speed and his plucky dashes soon made himself a friend with the crowd, but he could not be expected to shine on a day such as Saturday, and it is to be hoped that the Anfield crowd has the further pleasure of witnessing him. Like Fanny Walden in appearance, save for a more robust build, Waine has strength of shot, some tricks, and much speed. He’s worth persevering with.

Our half-backs were good and otherwise in turn. Norman Bradley did not manage Barlow at all well, but Arthur Goddard and Donald Mackinlay did capital work, each shooting on occasion, and Mackinlay getting on “severe” straight shot at Billy Hayes, who parried it with great judgment and seeming ease.

While Bradley found George Barlow a tartar, Longworth and the old Everton winger had even tussles, and neither could claim the palm; yet there was no doubt about George Barlow being the star forward on the field. His enthusiasm knows no bounds, and he had gained in experience and foot-craft since he left Everton.

Preston is hardly the place to unearth talent these times, but certain it is that Barlow has now more “vim” and “bite” about his attacks than he showed when he played at Everton. Further, I am told he has made occasional appearances as an inside player, and has worked wonderfully well and successfully.

Enthusiasm is necessary of Preston are to rise to their former state, and Saturday’s game win will do them a lot of good. They turned up late after a rocky and freezing journey, and they were hard pressed to complete the team, George Speak, a full back, playing centre forward with much credit. The odd thing was that Preston played against the wind with as much success as in the first half, when they had the gale at their backs.

The defeat of Liverpool was attributable to their meeting a better side and one capable of controlling the ball. Liverpool never had command of the ball or the game, and some of the forwards refused to take a shot at a venture, which was foolish.

Praise other than that already given must be awarded Elisha Scott, Percy Smith,

Pagnam was damaged in the first minute, and I am confident his failure to score was due to the bang he received on the stomach in the first five minutes of play. I have before now declared that the day will come when Pagnam will possibly break all goal-scoring records by gathering in a harvest of goals. Such a day as Saturday – with the wind carrying the ball inordinate lengths – was eminently the sort of day that suited my argument.

But, unfortunately, Ephraim Longworth, after seeming to win the toss, had to to set his team to face the rain and wind. This was Pagnam’s chance destroyed. Had Liverpool won the toss I feel sure Pagnam would have revelled in a goal-crop. As it was he was damaged, and, like the other members of the team, was fatigued by the strenuous game necessary against the wind. He did not do himself justice in the second half, and, in addition, he had little support from the left wing, which did not pair well, although in the first half they showed pretty footwork at times, and Dawson made a glorious teasing shot from the touchline. Watson had a fit of dribbles, and the little debutant on the extreme right suffered correspondingly.

What think you of Waine?

Tough, bullet-head Waine by his speed and his plucky dashes soon made himself a friend with the crowd, but he could not be expected to shine on a day such as Saturday, and it is to be hoped that the Anfield crowd has the further pleasure of witnessing him. Like Walden in appearance, save for a more robust build, Waine has strength of shot, some tricks, and much speed. He’s worth persevering with.

Our half-backs were good and otherwise in turn. Bradley did not manage Barlow at all well, but Goddard and Mackinlay did capital work, each shooting on occasion, and Mackinlay getting on “severe” straight shot at Hayes, who parried it with great judgment and seeming ease.

While Bradley found Barlow a tartar, Longworth and the old Everton winger had even tussles, and neither could claim the palm; yet there was no doubt about George Barlow being the star forward on the field. His enthusiasm knows no bounds, and he had gained in experience and footcraft since he left Everton.

Preston is hardly the place to unearth talent these times, but certain it is that Barlow has now more “vim” and “bite” about his attacks than he showed when he played at Everton. Further, I am told he has made occasional appearances as an inside player, and has worked wonderfully well and successfully.

Enthusiasm is necessary of Preston are to rise to their former state, and Saturday’s game win will do them a lot of good. They turned up late after a rocky and freezing journey, and they were hard pressed to complete the team, Speak, a full back, playing centre forward with much credit. The odd thing was that Preston played against the wind with as much success as in the first half, when they had the gale at their backs.

The defeat of Liverpool was attributable to their meeting a better side and one capable of controlling the ball. Liverpool never had command of the ball or the game, and some of the forwards refused to take a shot at a venture, which was foolish.

Praise other than that already given must be awarded Elisha Scott, Percy Smith, Frank McIlwraith, Harry Lee, Wilf Gillow, and the swarthy Joe McCall, who for a veteran played grand football.
(Source: Liverpool Echo: January 3, 1916)

XX

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