No goals between Liverpool and Burnley


October 2, 1916
The meeting of Burnley and Liverpool looked like giving a large crowd a grand exhibition, but for some reason unknown the game fizzled out badly after the first half, and the attempts of forwards and half-backs to score were very wild.

There was a decided haste on the part of some of the men to shoot, and at other times there was an unaccountable delay in shooting. In addition to the haste shown there was hastiness introduced, and the game was bad if on that account alone.

Too much roughness was seen, and I am glad that I did not see Freeman’s foul on Wadsworth – this mat appertise the gentleman who made certain queries to me on Saturday! I will vouch this, though; no centre-forward has hacked more than Freeman, and no forward has retaliated so infrequently. Mind you, I’m not referring to Saturday’ game, but to the Burnley centre’s career.

The Liverpool defence was top-hole, for if one could find fault with one or two pick-ups by Taylor against those one had to place two glorious saves – one from Freeman and one from Hodgson. Longworth and Lucas make up a great rearguard.

Bamber lamed could not do himself justice, and with Pagnam knocked out severely – this was the case of the penalty kick taken by Mackinlay – the home forwards were very erratic. Curtis may come on. Waine is a worrier and plesant to watch. Cunliffe has left his form behind this season, and Lewis improved.

Teams: –
Liverpool (2-3-5): Ted Taylor, Ephraim Longworth, Tommy Lucas, John Bamber, Walter Wadsworth, Donald Mackinlay, Robert Waine, Frank Curtis, Fred Pagnam, Harry Lewis, Tommy Cunliffe.
Burnley (2-3-5): Jerry Dawson, Jimmy Wilde, Harry Hastie, Yates, Tommy Boyle, Joe Wilde, Bob Kelly, Dick Lindley, Bert Freeman, Teddy Hodgson, Billy Kellock.
(Liverpool Echo: October 2, 1916)

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