Aston Villa F.C.: The annual meeting of 1923


June 18, 1923
Speaking at the annual meeting of Aston Villa, Mr. Frederick Rinder expressed the opinion that in Dr Vic Milne, of Aberdeen, they had secured a man who would fill the centre half position most effectively. In regard to other players, Mr. Rinder said: “We are quite prepared to pay the price when the right man comes along. As a matter of fact we have to pay for every young player we get; indeed, we have to pay for the average young player, the player we have to train ourselves, more than we paid for James Crabtree in the long ago.”

Mr. Rinder gave some interesting figures in regard to gates. The average League match produced £1,652, a decrease per match as compared with the previous year of £225; the average attendance was 27,879, a decrease per match of 4,694, but taking into consideration the depressed state of trade and so much unemployment, he thought that those figures were very satisfactory.

In regard to the balance-sheet, it would be seen that they now owed the bank £14,864, while last year they had a credit balance of £16,000. Those two sums together represented the amount spent on the new stand. They had a ground superior to any in the world, and their stand was superior to that at the Stadium. The holding capacity of the enclosure was now 80,000, while they had fifteen miles of terracing. There were 11,000 seats, 8,000 of them with tip-up chairs. Some idea of the immensity of their premises would be realised when he said that they had no fewer than 456 doors.
(Source: Athletic News: June 18, 1923)

Villa Park, home of Aston Villa F.C.

X

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.