Goodison Park thrills: Six goals shared in Derby game


January 6, 1930
Liverpool revive after being led 3-1
The second of the local Derby game between Everton and Liverpool resulted in a draw of three goals each, and none but the most prejudiced could complain of the fairness of the verdict. It was a game characterised by a wealth of fine football, not brilliant, but sufficiently fascinating and at times thrilling enough to please most people. It was rather unfortunate that a disputed goal (scored by Liverpool) should have crept in to a pleasant contest fought with commendable energy and spirit that reflected credit to all concerned. Everton’s form in the first half was a revelation, coming after the many defeats and changes. They played with buoyancy and confident that has not been seen for many a day, and when they took a 3-1 lead after eight minutes in the second half they seemed to be well on the way to success. It was at this stage, however, that Liverpool’s fighting qualities came to the surface, and from being forced to shoulder a lot of hard defensive work they attacked like giants refreshed. Goals came at seventy and seventy-two minutes that placed them on level terms, but they wanted more, and in the end Everton seemed satisfied to finish with a point. It was a wonderful revival, but it must be remembered that few sides are as well fitted as Liverpool for this type of game. Liverpool finished the stronger side, but Everton gave a sparkling display in the first half, and thus one is inclined to the view that justice was done with credit to both sides.

Smith’s capital goal.
At the end of ten minutes Smith, the Liverpool centre, snapped up a pass from Macpherson and scored a capital goal and the referee promptly pointed to the centre. His attention was, however, directed to the linesman on the grand stand side, who continued vigorously to wave his flag. After consultation the referee revoked his decision, presumably on the grounds of offside. Naturally much debate centred round the incident and it must have been a very fine point that only a judge on the spot could decide. Liverpool’s disappointment was made greater when Critchley gave Everton the lead four minutes later, and the interval came with Everton leading by the only goal. Dean increased Everton’s lead at fifty minutes and two minutes afterwards Edmed scored for Liverpool. This was followed a minute later by a second goal for Dean. Afterwards Liverpool got definitely on top, and following Macpherson’s clever header at seventy minutes, McDougall levelled the score at seventy-two minutes. Smith lost a fine chance of putting Liverpool ahead when Davies missed a clearance that took him out of the goal.

How the players fared.
Both Riley and Davies did well and there was little to choose between then. Lucas and Jackson were steadier and more consistent as a pair than Cresswell and O’Donnell. Cresswell did a lot of neat work in the first half, but near the end he seemed to lack fire and was hardly keen enough in his tackles. Everton took the honours in the half-back line and McPherson, the Swansea player made a good impression. He was confident and cool almost to the point of appearing nonchalant in most of his work, but his ability was beyond question. None did better than Robson – a real honest worker, always where the flight was hardest. Hart made a fine pivot, and opened out some delightful chances. Morrison was the best on the Liverpool side, with his usual neat classy style. Liverpool had a fine forward in Hopkins and accurate he wanted few chances and made a big number. Smith was a dangerous leader, although he missed a couple of easy openings in the second half, while McPherson played a useful game, Hodgson tended to slow up the line, and Edmed’s good work came in patches. Dean’s return a great difference to the Everton attack and if he was not as good as he can be he provided some delightful touches, one of his best was a brilliant header to a centre by Critchley that Riley did well to save. Critchley played one of his best games especially in the first half and Dunn made him a capital partner. Good work came from Rigby and Stein was by no means out of the picture.

Teams:
Everton: Arthur Davies, Warney Cresswell, Jack O’Donnell, Tom Robson, Hunter Hart, Lachlan McPherson, Ted Critchley, Jimmy Dunn, Dixie Dean, Arthur Rigby, Jimmy Stein.
Liverpool: Arthur Riley, James Jackson, Tommy Lucas, Tom Morrison, Jimmy McDougall, Tom Bromilow, Dick Edmed, Gordon Hodgson, Jimmy Smith, Archie Macpherson, Fred Hopkin.
(Source: Liverpool Daily Post: January 6, 1930)

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