Liverpool v Everton 5-2 (Benefit for the Lord Mayor’s War Fund)


Saturday, August 21 – 1943
Match: Benefit for Lord Mayor’s War Fund, at Anfield.
Liverpool – Everton 5-2 (0-0).
Attendance: 13,250; gate receipts: £946.
Referee: Mr. J.A. Tomason (Chester).
Liverpool (2-3-5): Alf Hobson, Kenneth Seddon, Jack Westby, Harry Kaye, Laurie Hughes, Jack Pilling, Billy Liddell, Jack Balmer, Cyril Done, Don Welsh (Charlton Athletic), Alf Hanson.
Everton (2-3-5): George Burnett, George Jackson, Norman Greenhalgh, Archie Livingstone (Bury), Tom Jones, Bob Pryde (Blackburn Rovers), Jack Grant, Stan Bentham, Jimmy McIntosh (Preston), Alex Stevenson, George Makin.
The goals: 0-1 McIntosh, 0-2 McIntosh, 1-2 Balmer (82 min.), 2-2 Liddell (81 min.), 3-2 Welsh (83 min.), 4-2 Welsh (87 min.), 5-2 Welsh (88 min.).

Thrilling Derby Finish.
Welsh’s Hat-Trick.
One of the main attractions of football is that nothing about it is ever a foregone conclusion, and never was this more borne out than in the pre-season game between Liverpool and Everton at Anfield. With Everton on top in play and two goals to the good and only ten minutes to go, it looked long odds on a Liverpool defeat, but the game’s glorious uncertainty was demonstrated in one of the most sensational finishes ever seen at Anfield, in which eight minutes of concentrated thrills produced a nap hand for the Reds.

Balmer set the kop roaring when he headed in Liddell’s “picture” centre and thereafter the kopites never let up for a moment. Talk about the Hampden roar, Spion kop, allowing for the disparity in numbers had it beaten to a frazzle on Saturday. The spectators spurred Liddell on to put the sides all square, and then veiled themselves hoarse when Done, Welsh added three more in the next five minutes. Seldom has there been no swift a transformation; and though mistakes and misfortunes in Everton’s defence contributed to their downfall. Liverpool earn full marks for their fine fighting finish.

Burnett was at fault with the second and third goals – against which we remember his really brilliant saves earlier on –and was unlucky with the fifth, which was deflected right out of the reach.

Liverpool’s revival came when Manager George Kay sent out word for Welsh and Done to change places. It did the trick and Everton were pipped on the post when victory seemed certain.

Fast and Exhilarating.
It was a fast and exhilarating game, and though the cracking pace led to a slightly dull period in the second half, the thrilling finish more than compensated. Liverpool will gain confidence from this for their big test on Saturday when Manchester City open the season proper. Welsh and Balmer were outstanding for the winners; Hanson has lost none of his old craft, Liddell was below par, and Hughes played a splendid game of the bold and aggressive type Seddon also did promisingly.

For the losers Tom Jones was head and shoulder above the rest. The backs could hardly be blamed for the debacle, for they had to shoulder a lot of the wing halve work in the closings stages. Stevenson and Bentham were beat in attack with ‘A’ teamers Makin and Grant doing quite well.

The attendance of 13,250 did not quite come up to expecting. If anybody stayed away because this was just another practices they will have realised too late what they missed. The proceeds were £946, and the collection £30, and the Lord Mayor’s war fund benefit’s accordingly. The Lord Mayor (Alderman R. Duncan French) went into the dressing rooms after the match to thank the players all of whom had given their services without fee. Thanks are also due to the boards of both clubs for this very useful acquisition to the fund. It was a grand appraiser. There will be many League games which won’t come up to this standard.
(Liverpool Echo, 23-08-1943)

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